In my classroom: Five days until finals

When this blog goes up, Tom and I will be participating in the Color Run 5K in Queens. Honestly I’m not feeling it at the moment (T-11 hours until it starts…no turning back!), but I’m excited because a bunch of my teacher friends will be doing it and a few more will be cheering on the sidelines. And then we’ll hang out and chill (literally, as in icing our sore, out of shape bodies) for a while after the race. Here’s Tom and I at our first and only other 5K two summers ago!

5k

Anyways, a consensus of students and teachers at our school [and probably any school in America] would say that the past two weeks were hell-a long. They’ve been stressful and busy and long and…well, I mean, that’s typical for teachers at the end of May with final exams and reports coming up. We are down to 5 school days until final exams start. Like, what?!?!?!?

Last week, my Algebra I class continued with linear functions, focusing on figuring out if a point lies on a given line and finding the equation of line given the slope and a point on the line. This past week, we found where lines intersect (AKA solving systems of linear equations) by graphing and by substitution. They took the unit test on Thursday, and we started reviewing for the final exam on Friday.

I was so relieved when I finished creating, printing, and copying review sheets for both of my Algebra classes because that meant I was set for the next week. It also means that I have a pretty decent foundation to create the final exams. This week will be devoted to reviewing/studying for the final, so it’s pretty much just autopilot from here on out.

For Algebra II, I’m really happy to be able to say that my students have been using trig functions (all 3!) to find a missing side and a missing angle. I originally was only going to cover sine with them, but once we did some problems together, they told me that it was really easy. So we then worked through cosine and tangent problems and they have been doing so well. We even did some word problems with trig functions (you know, the shadow of a pole is this long and the angle between the ground and the top of the pole is the much, find how tall the pole is…). We also learned the Law of Sines because they were doing so well.

They took their unit test on Wednesday and we started reviewing for the final exam on Friday. Except they’re all seniors except for one and they seem to have checked out, so not much was accomplished during the last period on Friday. Oh well, I see them all 5 days until the final exam, so I think we’ll be okay.

Math in Everyday Life has been heavily focused on finding tax (we stick to 10%) and the total amount of a purchase with tax included. We’ll be reviewing in that class too so they feel comfortable going into their final exam.

Over the past 2 weeks, we had a Performing Arts Night and the school musical (it was Annie this year and the students did phenomenally!), I judged the middle school science fair, I attended a professional development conference in Times Square, and Mary and I have worked out four out of the five school days both weeks. Yeah!

As much as I’m looking forward to the end of the school year, the end of the stress that is at its peak this time of year for teachers, I will miss the routine and the people I get to see and interact with every day. It’s so convenient and easy to see these people I care about because we’re all under the same roof for 8+ hours everyday and we’re all dealing with similar issues. So as much as I’m feeling overwhelmed and can’t wait for June 19th (official last day for faculty), I plan on enjoying and savoring these next 3 weeks before people start scattering for the summer, some to return in the fall and others who will begin new adventures elsewhere.

I got to teach today…

I got to teach today. And it felt so good.

I haven’t gotten to “properly” teach in over a year and a half now. Since my last long-term substitute gig, I’ve been a teacher’s assistant and have covered and helped out in a few classes at my current school. But I haven’t gotten the chance to truly teach (make my own lesson, deliver it, evaluate my teaching, etc) my own class for awhile now.

At the moment I’m a paraprofessional for a high school student with Cerebral Palsy. I’m in a school all day, everyday. And I’m certified to teach middle and/or high school math in New York State. And I’ve been getting antsy since finishing grad school.

I’ve been applying to teaching jobs for the coming up school year. So far I’ve had 2 interviews at two different private schools in Brooklyn, and both asked me back to do a demo lesson.

So today was one of those demos, and it went really well!

I chose to teach a trig lesson about the basics of the unit circle that included using trig functions like sine and cosine. I can hear your anxious groans and sighs from high school memories of this stuff.

But it went great! Some of the students in the room had not taken trigonometry yet, and others only knew the basics like SOH CAH TOA (which I went more in depth about the meaning of). There were students that were eager to participate, and others that would not have said a word had I not called on them.

One student, while I asked everyone to discuss something with their partner, actually called me over and told me he was very lost. I asked where he got stuck, and he showed me. I re-explained the work we had just done (he got that), re-explained what I was asking them all to do (he got that), and re-asked where he got lost.

I love when that happens! Not only was I really proud of him for admitting he was lost and asking for help, but he also made me think deeply about what I was asking and how to ask it differently in a way that was more clear. He ended up getting it, only taking an extra 30 seconds or so, without me spoon-feeding the answer to him!

The lesson was only 30 minutes long so it definitely flew by. I over-planned, causing me to only get through half of my lesson, but we stopped at a good spot that completed one idea. By the end, everyone understood what we had done and the only questions I received were about my name (whether ‘Chatt’ was English) and about teaching (whether it’s difficult to get a teaching job, especially at certain parts of the year).

I was told my name was awesome (I told them my whole name) and was thanked multiple times by the students. I think I’ll find out any hiring decisions within the next few days at that school so that the math teachers who sat in on my lesson can talk it over and also report to the headmaster.

My next demo lesson (at my current school!) is coming up on Thursday and I can’t wait – it’ll be about area and perimeter, and I’ll throw variables and “real-world” problems into the mix, not just numbers.

I forgot how wonderful I feel when I teach and get to interact with students. Even though I’m the teacher, I come out of each lesson having learned something.

I learn that I sometimes talk too fast.

I learn who needs a bit more time to answer a question.

I learn math in a deeper way so that I can teach it in a deeper way.

It’s a really great feeling and it reminds me that I chose the right profession for me.

Fingers crossed that I get offered one (or both!) of the jobs so that I can continue to grow and learn as an educator and mentor.